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and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
back on the table. congresswoman january schawowsky and the deficit reduction act. the bill would offer the choice of the publically run health insurance plan. and get this, it would save a hundred billion dollars over the next ten years. this bill is a win for everybody. it will reduce the deficit. obama care has brought the number of uninsured americans to the lowest level since 2008. however, the law would be fully implemented until 2014. it would put pressure on all insurers to lower their premiums in order to compete. it would also provide immediate relief to small businesses and the federal government and all parts of the economy. for example, former defense secretary robert gates has warned the rising -- he has warned of rising military costs for years. >> sharply rising health care costs are consuming an ever-larger share of this department. growing from 19 billion 234 in . >> military health care costs have gone up 300% in the past decade. 2012 was the first year since 1995 military personnel saw an increase in health care premiums. now, there are two things republicans love. t
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone
that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the stability in what is going to happen in terms of the voting of economic growth. estimate what the peak to the cut a piece of that. the spending on health not necessarily the biggest cost of the deficit right now but if you look at 20 years, for 30 years it is the alligator that is going to swallow everything. i was on a panel last week and there was a lively argument around should we raise the age for medicare, should we try to change the system and have a fee for service, has the obama administration done a lot to lower the cost of health care going forward so we don't need to do much more? what do you think is in practical terms what needs to be done on health care if you poll people they say we all want to cut medicare celerity want to go dealing with that piece of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a
in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab
on the achievements made in the first term and he looks at this in a broadway because this isn't deficit reduction, for example, is not a goal onto itself. we pursue it in order to help the economy and help create jobs. otherwise it's not worth the effort, in his mind. >> mike pence delivers his first state of the state address tonight. we'll have that live for you at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. tomorrow, secretary of state hillary clinton testifies on capitol hill on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. first up, she's before the senate foreign relations committee. that's live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. then, in the afternoon the secretary before the house foreign affairs committee. that's set to get under way at 2:00 p.m. eastern. again, both of those hearings live on c-span3. also, c-span.org tomorrow. also tomorrow, the house will postpone a decision, will debate a bill postponing on raising the nation's debt ceiling. you saw pete sessions, the rules committee chairman, filing that rule on the house floor a moment ago. they met this afternoon to discuss the flan whi
agenda, talking about jobs, dealing with the deficit, getting out of afghanistan. imgrapgs. not small goals. what are his chances of getting thinged accomplished? >> i think there's a path on immigration and that would probably be done soonler rather than later. i remember rahm emanuel saying never let a crisis go to waist waste. the republicans have a crisis in terms of attracting hispanic voters. so they need to deal with immigration reform. is prospects for that look very good. you look at the previous president, what tripped them up, you didn't mention lyndon johnson, but his presidency got devoured by the war in vietnam. he had a terrific legislative record. this president is very careful about getting this country involved in another international crisis, war. he's overly cautious and is getting us out of afghanistan, whether that's a good or bad idea. it's coming to an end. he's very much aware of history. i think we can check the box on the personal life. i have confidence he's not going to get in trouble in his personal life. i think the legislative confrontations are the tou
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit area but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [cheers] [applause] we remember the lessons of our past. twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability have nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country that freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us, at any time, they may face a job loss or sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things strengthen us. [cheers] [applause] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [cheers] [applause] we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves, but to all prosperity we will respond to the
in the economy. they worry about interest rates going up and they worry about the impact on our deficit. because when interest rates go up, that means the deficit will go up. so we make the problem worse by taking this route if we go down this pathway. >> i want to throw three terms at you that we've had to stomach out in america. debate over the fiscal cliff, the debate over the debt ceiling and the budget show dunn. all three of these very serious. but which is the most serious. >> the debt ceiling could do damage to our countries for decades to come if we hit it and don't expect the problem. this is the most dangerous thing. this is almost a nuclear option. this is really playing with very dangerous things. and one little mistake could be devastating to our country. >> and yet you still come on day after day and smile with me. thank you. always good to see you. >>> by the way, i just want to remind you if you're doing the math, the treasury says it might come up short in its payments as soon as february 15th. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it wort
deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. >> bill: so the question -- so why should the president entertain this notion that the debt ceiling which republicans voted for 19 times under george w. bush without a peep, you know, why should he entertain the notion that suddenly this is a matter of big negotiations? >> well, he's trying to say that he shouldn't but unfortunately the house republicans have the majority in congress. unfortunately for him, so when he says he doesn't want to debate it and negotiate over it, he is running up against the fact that people who have the power in the house do want to debate it and that can cause problems. he certainly is pushing this idea here to try to remove this from the realm of what he wants and the american people see as rational debate. he used a lot of words yesterday that were very strong to try to make people see this as what he called an absurd way of approaching this. he talked about this being like holding a gun to your head or ransom. this
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next day-to-day. jon: so what about that statement from the president, true or false? a fact check on that and a bunch of others. we'll have the answers for you coming up. jon: right now lawmakers are working on a strategy to try to keep the government running. they only have about 4-6 weeks left before the nation hits the national debt ceiling. republicans are calling for budge cuts in return for raising the debt ceiling, but president obama came out swinging during his news conference on monday claiming he's already gone a long way toward closing the budget gap. joining us now to fact check some of his statements, stephen hayes, a senior writer for the weekly standard and a fox news contributor, douglas holtz-eakin is now president of the american action forum. just as a general rule, steven, when you heard the president speaking in that news conference, was he generally being honest with the american people about
a conversation about how to redust our deficit let's have that. we've been having that nor the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. by the way the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need for us to grow this economy. martha: bob beckel is former democratic campaign manager and cohost of the five. mary katherine ham is editor at large and fox news contributor. why do you think it was so testy yesterday? >> obama's best form is not necessarily a press conference which is why he does than do many of them. i which he was testy for one real reason. the republicans trying to take the full faith and crucify the united states currency and putting it at fist being. i'd invoke the 14th amendment, we'd problem below know that if we spent more time with the republicans wasting time on the floor of the house. i thought he ought to raise it and to hell with congress. martha: we talked to stewart varney and kirsten said in that sound byte, this isn't about default, people don't think we aren't going to pay the debt o
thought their one idea, david, was cutting the deficit. >> that's -- they say that's the case, but it really is they want to just talk about spending cuts as if that is going to help the economy. and any mainstream economist now tells you that you may have to do that in some ways for long-term deficit implications but that's not good in the short run. even simpson/bowles say don't cut so fast. >> and just to be clear, it's not at all clear that they actually have coherent plans for anything they're suggesting. they have sort of hand waving spending cuts, entitlement reform without really writing down a specific path to get there. >> incredible. david corn and jared bernstein, gentlemen, thank you so much. stay with us. we'll be right back. what do we want to build next ? that's the question. every day. when you have the most advanced tools, you want to make something with them. something that helps. helps safeguard our shores. helps someone see through a wall of fire. helps those nowhere near the right doctor stand a chance. ... feeling in the extremities ? no. technology can
there is a third phase here they consider country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to gdp, deficit to gdp down around 3%, which is all economists are training center greer that areas we can begin to cruise the country and as my grandfather used to say that the grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, we may very well be able to meet the goal we set out to do, which is to have roughly $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and put us on that past. i didn't come here to talk about any of this important subjects today because as important as they all are today we have a mortgage and indie media call and that is how to do with the epidemic of gun violence in america. the one of the statistics better than anyone, so i'm not going to repeat it. on that score i might add ale in a credible threat of gratitude to many of you at the table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity and this ballroom, nor do we have any ballroom, but we all know, it wanted knowledges we have to do some gain. we
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
deficit hawk. the republican senate committee budget guru, and he is offsetting most of the first slice. the bill's actually two pieces, 17 billion and 34 billion. and he's offsetting the 17 billion portion with a across-the-board cut. so it'll be interesting to see if that passes or not. you know, all democrats will vote against it, and i suspect that it will fail. but it'll be interesting to see. for him it's important because they want to establish the principle that emergency spending needs to be offset with spending cuts. which is something that democrats are very afraid of, because they feel like every time there's a disaster, republicans use it as an excuse to go after domestic programs, social services and so forth. so that'll be an important precedent, and then we'll see what happens in the senate. you know, we'll probably see a house/senate conference on the bill or some ping-ponging between the chambers and probably delaying final enactment. >> host: yeah. and the washington times reporting this morning that the conservative group for growth is threatening to punish members w
was raised in august, the political fight and the spotlight on the count row's deficit and debt problems led s&p to downgrade the u.s. credit rating for the first time in history. >> geithner steered the major economic moves in the first term, now he's stepping down at treasury. the pick to replace him is jack lew, who has established a close relationship with the president. he is know chummy with the republicans on the hill after the debt ceiling negotiation. for that reason and other, his looming confirmation hearing could be bumpy. but if confirmed, lew will likely be dealing with the top issue in this second term, how to get the economy moving and addressing the count re's long-term fiscal problems. >> this is a president that is forced to grapple to the tenor of our times with the budget woes, with the economy that can't get over the hump. it's going to consume most of his time, i believe, in the second term. >> what he cannot do, going into this term is go from economic crisis to economic crisis. that's not leadership. what he will have to do is figure out how we address this in a broa
, according to respondents of the latest gallup poll looking at the deficit and the economy and unemployment is far more important. public policy in washington. the president is going after our guns, unveiling the most sweeping set of gun-control proposals and nearly two decades here is this moments. the reason that there is so for the second amendment to prevail despite his assault. the decade-long assault weapons ban, which ran from 1994, it did not work. 1994 was a different year, by the way, then this year, 2013. and the political conditions are quite different because the reality of america is quite different. it is important to look back and think about the fact that in '94, the house, the senate, and the white house were all controlled by democrats. today republicans control just the house as the president likes to constantly remind us. back then president clinton pushed the assault weapons ban as part of a broader crime bill. it was not just an imperious and grabbed, but it was an important piece of legislation, and it was a different time. despite the prosperity, the american public
've really got to do this. you were talking about debt and deficit and government spending 15, 20 years ago when nobody was that much focused on it in washington, but now they really are. here is a chance for you to take all you learned, what you learned on the way up, on the way down, in congress, in the governorship, and apply it to what is really the debate of our times. if you look, we're having a new fiscal crisis it seems every couple months. we had the debt ceiling, the fiscal crisis, and that's really the tip of the iceberg that is coming our way based on unbelievable demographics and unbelievably unsustainable government spending. what i want to do is take what i learned and hopefully apply it to again a great conundrum that now exists in washington, which is how do we get our financial house in order? >> i wish you all the very best. thank you for joining me again tonight. it's a pleasure to talk to you as it was last time. i genuinely wish you well. i'm glad you're making another go at this. good luck with it. >> i appreciate it, thanks. >>> a critic who says newtown changed ever
states right now is very disproportionately chirping. cities cannot and budget deficits. what happens when you something like the great recession quite cities all over the country having to scale back because they can't run budget deficits. exactly which you don't want to do a scaled-back local employment during the economic downturn. this is a huge thing. the department of justice program provides grants to local law enforcement to hire more police. the program could easily be 20 or 30 times its billion dollars a year size. it would be one of the most productive things the federal government could do to make progress in this area. >> we agree. i think what the professor just outlined in the latter part of what he said is go after illegal gun markets. were talking about people balanced or selling guns to felons, people engaged in gun sales that are illegal under any interpretation of the law and go after criminal people with records who are carrying guns illegally. that's been done in cooperation in chicago. i think the important thing is to find ways to go after the criminals here. b
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
disease to addiction, parenting to attention deficit disorder, his work focuses on the centrality of early childhood experiences to the development of the brain and how those who experience these experiences can impact everything from behavioral patterns to pca
to being able to destabilize our debt and deficit. this is insanity. he's making the case we stopped corporate loopholes his white house after biden demand this had he put the loopholes in the fiscal deal. and the president is disingenuous beyond wlbelief. of course he's irritated he's walking a tightrope on this, a thin edge. >> megyn: doked for president clinton who i just mentioned with michael reagan, this national journal article today that talks about among others, bill clinton, his ability to reach across the aisle and make deals with people he didn't necessarily love politically. but the suspicion of government feeding hungry children, we have it teed up, and helped in this president's ability to do this and i'll get your reaction, this is on suspicion, take a listen. >> they have suspicions about social security. they have suspicions about whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat or whether we should be spending money on medical research, so they've got a particular view of what government should do and should be. >> megyn: go ahead,
downgrade. we didn't even increased the deficit. >> uh-huh. >> hurt the economy, jobs monthly job growth was cut in half. this is serious. >> yeah. the idea that they would play politics with this debt ceiling is really unconshunable. >> we are seeing the financial sector weigh in now business roundtable chamber of commerce. >> do you know how bad it is? get this. the koch brothers yesterday came out. the koch brothers. >> allies, our allies now. >> yeah. they came out yesterday and said, republicans are making a big mistake to play politics with the debt ceiling. when the koch brothers and jan schakowski are on the same side -- >> that's a headline right there. >> i think it is. all right. evans mcmorris good to see you? >> sure. >> congresswoman, it was good to see you. >> enjoyed it. >> thanks so much. i will be back with a quick parting shot here. >> this is "the bill press show." rogaine? well, i'll admit it. i was skeptical at first. but after awhile even my girlfriend noticed a difference. [ male announcer ] rogaine is proven to help sto
means of controlling deficits, and a danger to this country's standing in the world financial markets. >> we must not permit and artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression, which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. jon: some conservative groups warn that removing the limit is a recipe for economic disaster, as we're seeing now in greece. the leaders of heritage action family research council and club for growth writing in an op ed they want congress to balance the budget within ten years and keep it balanced. quote, no american should have to tell an eight-year-old child that we cannot get our nation's house in order by the time she goes to college. there are many ways to get to a d republicans haved both an obligation to explain what path they will choose. jonah goldberg is editor at large for national review online, he's also a fox news contributor. get rid of the debt ceiling all together? jonah, what do you think about that idea? >> well i don't think it's a disaster if we got rid of the debt ceiling but i
talking about deficit, government spending 1520 years ago when nobody was that much focused on it. they are now. here's a chance for you to take what you learned on the way up, what you learned on the way down, what you learned in congress before, what you learned in the governorship and apply it to what is really the debate of our time. >> you will remember his governorship, which was riddled with that story where he admitted an affair with a woman from argentina back in 2009. >>> look at this, unless you're a little claustrophobic. this oregon woman spent nearly four hours trapped in an eight-inch space between an apartment building and a 20-foot wall. this happened early wednesday morning in downtown portland. apparently she fell from a second floor smoking area and getting her out was not easy. firefighters had to cut through a section of wall and used air bags to widen the space. lieutenant rich chapman is the firefighter who pulled that woman out. >> we were assuring her we were doing everything to get her out. we weren't going home without her. that was it. we used basicall
, three months, four months and more if need be when he wants to do big things on debt and deficit, big things on medicare, comprehensive immigration reform, and will be in a fight with republicans over that? this is going to be a test of how long the president is prepared to wage what -- to get hard stuff done to get an assault weapons ban, to get the magazine clips, universal background check is easier, but the president has to dig in and fight and it will be fascinating to watch. >> this is a statement we have gotten from the nra, national rifle association, part of the statement. we look forward to working with congress on a bipartisan basis to find real solutions to protecting america's most valuable asset, our children. attacking firearms and ignoring children is not a solution to the crisis we face as a nation, only honest, law abiding gun owners will be affected and our children will remain vulnerable to the inevitability of more tragedy. to the inevitability of more tragedy, john king, to the latter part of that statement, congress could enact everything that the president is a
the deficit, let your member of congress know. if you believe we can solve this problem through compromise, send that message. america, after all, has always been a grand experiment in compromise. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they already racked up. if congress refuses to give the united states the ability to pay its bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy could be catastrophic. the last time they threatened this course of action our entire economy suffered for it. >> all right. the trajectory of the perspective of compromise. >> that's entertaining but i think a i have a little bit of minority opinion. some of it is a bit overstated. in you're preamble setting this up. to assume that when the president was delivering that speech in 2009, that he did not understand just how difficult the road ahead would be and just how much recess substance he would get from the other party. i think, understates the sophistication that this man has about politics and he knew what the moment was in 2009. i think that
. president obama has racked up more spending, $1 trillion deficits. and it's time that he join us in this effort to get our fiscal house in order. what is a drag on the economy is the spending. that is what is hurting hard-working taxpayer right now. and so we need him to join us in this effort. >> at the end of the day, this is going to be a question about public opinion. what makes you think talking about not raising the debt ceiling or shutting down the government, what have you, is a winner in the court of public opinion? >> well, again, we don't want to shut down the government, but in the court of public opinion, people also know that the federal government and the out of control spending is unsustainable. and large majorities of the american people want us to cut spending, to start making the tough decisions, to balance our budgets, start living within our means. the american people, in their own families, they understand that you have to do that. you have to make the tough decisions. you have to get your budget, you've got to put it in order. and they expect their elected
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
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